Pigs reared in Batu Lintang Camp had better food than the POWs

When Batu Lintang camp was liberated on Sept 11, 1945 by the Australian 9th Division, the camp population was 2,024. Overall, there were 1,392 prisoners of wars (POWs), 395 were male civilian internees and 237 were civilian women and children. There were two death orders found among the official Japanese papers at

A Bisaya legend of how a sago tree came into existence

A Bisaya legend of how a sago tree came into existence Every culture has its unique legends and most of these legends were used to explain things surrounding them. These legends usually circle around how certain plants or animals were discovered or came into being. Sometimes, they also explain why some creatures or

Get to know the three principal sources of Iban augury

Where were omens believed to have come from? Get to know the three principal sources of Iban augury In Iban augury, believers rely on different ways to receive indicative omens when making a decision or taking an action. The omens can be deliberately sought or accidentally encountered. According to Clifford Sather in his

What happened to the 300 prisoners of Labuan POW camp during WW2?

Flying over the prisoner of war camp (POW) in Batu Lintang at a low height, RAAF Beaufighter pilots reported sighting white POWs, clad in khaki shorts, who excitedly waved as the RAAF aircraft flew over to drop leaflets announcing Japan's surrender. Credits: Public Domain (Copyright expired). https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C242106 When it comes to

The cession of Sipitang by Brunei Sultanate to British North Borneo

Just like Sarawak, many of North Borneo (present-day Sabah)’s territories were part of the Brunei Sultanate. These territories were slowly annexed by the British North Borneo Chartered Company (BNBC) into the British North Borneo including Sipitang. The people of Sipitang (Sepitong, Sipitong or Si Pitong) So what is it like in Sipitang during

How the human races were formed according to a Sihan legend

The Sihan people are among the few tribes in Sarawak that are vulnerable to extinction along with smaller tribes such as the Ukit and Kejaman peoples.According to the Borneo Post in 2012, there are less than 300 Sihan people left in Sarawak. Unfortunately, they have been assimilated into other Orang Ulu